Devin

Legal Issues 3

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Notat all time is deviant behavior permissible by law for it conformsnot to the social norms and values of the society. It is one of thebehaviors that elicit very negative responses, though it can eitherbe formal or informal, voluntary or involuntary. in this casehas been arrested and convicted of child pornography that is adeviant behavior. Child pornography is charged both for possessionand distribution for one primary reason, of getting it in a room thatin itself is a crime and going ahead and distributing the materialsmaking it more serious offense (Champion etal. 2012).

Severepenalties are provided for by the law on child pornographers’producers and distributors in the society. Possessing childpornography subjects the offender to prison sentences alwaysconverted to probation for first-time offenders. A statistics carriedout in 2008 on child pornography laws by the&nbspInternationalCentre for Missing &amp Exploited Children&nbsp(ICMEC)revealed that 93 countries out of the total 187 had no specific lawsaddressing child pornography. The 94 other countries that were foundto have stipulated laws, 36 of them do not judge the act as acriminal (Quayle&amp Taylor, 2002)

InOklahoma, for example, the act of downloading child pornography isnot only sex offense but treated as a computer crime too. ComputerCrimes Act at the state makes it an offense to utilize computernetwork in breaking the law. A person found guilty will be subjectedto five years imprisonment and a fine of a certain amount.

Theappropriate way to deal with is to ascertain whether he usesany sexually stimulating materials and ban them. Also enroll him intoother educative programs and demystify the effects of childpornography.

References

Champion,D., Hartley, R. D., &amp Rabe, G. A. (2012).Criminalcourts: Structure, process, and issues. UpperSaddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

Quayle,E., &amp Taylor, M., (2002) Childpornography and the internet: perpetuatinga cycle of abuseDeviant BehaviorVolume23,&nbspIssue4, pages 331-361,